Wednesday

February: Jamal Igle

Jamal Igle's work is hard to sum up in a few sentences. A lot of that is intentional. He's spent much of his career over more than two decades trying to be indispensable, moving from one project to another, a lot of short runs and fill-ins for various companies. That didn't necessarily help him develop a style or a following among fans, but it did help him hone his skill and it made him a valuable artist to editors.

Igle's work has been defined by only a handful of long runs on books. With Firestorm and Supergirl, he was able to carve out a run on books where he was able to define the characters and the visual world. It was his run on Supergirl that really helped to establish him as a masterful artist. While his earlier work may not have had a particular "Igle style," the truth is that when given the room, Igle was able to demonstrate his skill and his style with ease.

Igle moved on to draw The Ray, a four issue miniseries from DC Comics written by Jimmy Palmiotti and Justin Gray, relaunching the Golden Age hero. The book was incredibly fun and the three managed to craft an incredible book, which unfortunately, has yet to be collected.

Since then Igle has been branching out. His book Molly Danger is  a passion project that he wrote and illustrated, was kickstarted by Igle and eventually published by Action Labs. Meanwhile Igle has also been working on various other work for hire projects including KISS and Terminator: Enemy of my Enemy. He's been talking about the next Molly Danger book as well as other creator owned projects he wants to work on in the next few years.

One of his goals with Molly Danger was to make a book that he could share with his young daughter. It's an interesting concept, though the first book only hints at what seems possible with this character and this world. The sense of fun and playfulness that Igle brinsg to his creations, and yet the seriousness with which he treats the characters' feelings and concerns, are very powerful, and something that we could use more of in comics.

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